Art and Analysis: Two Netherlandish painters working in Scotland

It has been very gratifying to see conservation in Scotland making the news this week, ahead of the opening of the new Scottish National Portrait Gallery display. Open the link below to access details of the exhibition and a short film on the technical examination and conservation treatment associated with the project.

Art and Analysis: Two Netherlandish painters working in Scotland

Focussing on the two 17th-century artists Adrian Vanson and Adam de Colone, this small exhibition presents the findings of a collaborative research project between paintings conservator Dr Caroline Rae, the Courtauld Institute of Art Caroline Villers Research Fellow, and the National Galleries of Scotland Conservation Department. On display are a group of paintings from the National Galleries of Scotland collection which have been examined by Caroline using cutting-edge technology,  including X-radiography, infrared reflectography and dendrochronology.

The display will also feature the very exciting discovery of a painting of a woman believed to be Mary, Queen of Scots, hidden underneath a painting by Adrian Vanson. The painting, which is owned by the National Trust, will be in the exhibition alongside more information about the hidden painting.

 

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The Plenderleith Lecture 2017: Conservation+ with Helen Shenton

Details of this year’s Plenderleith Memorial lecture have been announced! Please see below for more information. Before the event, we have also organised a tour of National Museums Conservation Collections Centre Granton, and as always, members are invited to attend the Icon Scotland Group’s AGM which precedes the lecture. 

  • Title: Conservation+ personal reflections on a journey from conservator to director.
  • Speaker: Helen Shenton
  • Date: Thursday 30 November 2017
  • Time: 6.15pm – 7.15pm
  • Location: National Galleries of Scotland, The Mound (entrance off Princes Street Gardens), Edinburgh, EH2 2EL
  • Cost: Student £6, Icon Member £12, Non-Icon Member £13

Booking through Eventbrite.

Helen Shenton

The Scottish Conservation sector’s keynote annual Plenderleith lecture for 2017 will explore changes in the heritage sector and the potential for conservation professionals to influence those changes, with reference to the career of Helen Shenton. Helen has travelled from the V&A to the British Library to Harvard to Trinity College Dublin, and journeyed from being a bench conservator to her current directorial role of Librarian and College Archivist at Trinity College Dublin. She will reflect on conservation, cultural heritage and management from her perspective of having worked in different roles across different sectors in the UK, Australia, America and Ireland, and will develop some ideas about ‘going broad and deep’ to other disciplines, professions, media and technologies beyond conservation.

The lecture will last from 6.15 – 7.15pm and will be preceded by the Icon Scotland Group’s AGM (to which all members are invited) from 5.30 – 6.00pm, and followed by a drinks reception.

A CPD visit to the National Museums Conservation Collections Centre in Granton will run in the afternoon from 2.30 – 4.30pm, and is bookable separately through Eventbrite

For a sneak preview of this year’s speaker, please see below the TEDx talk she gave in 2014 entitled ‘Collaboratories and bubbles of shush – how libraries are transforming’.

This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. On the 5th of July 2009, Helen Shenton was one of only three people alive who had seen the entire Codex Sinaiticus, the oldest complete copy of the New Testament and one of the most important books in the world. The next day, a digital version of the book went online and within 24 hours 20 million people had seen it. Helen explains how the digital shift will transform libraries of the future.

Helen Shenton is Librarian and College Archivist at Trinity College Dublin. Before that, Helen was Executive Director of Harvard Library in the US where 73 individual libraries make up Harvard’s 378-year old library system. Helen understand the impact new technologies are having on libraries, and has been involved in projects such as the virtual re-unification of the earliest New Testament.