Conservation in Scotland and Brexit

The Icon Scotland Group were asked for details on what leaving the EU might mean for conservators.  Rather than shrug and say ‘No Idea’, we thought it best to see if we could find some specifics to comment on. Carol, Ylva and Rob put together the below response with help from Alison and Siobhan at London HQ. Our response goes to Built Environment Forum for Scotland (Icon is a member of this) who collate it with others and send to the Scottish Government. Please do let us know your thoughts on this!

Institute of Conservation response to the Built Environment Forum Scotland (BEFS) information request

Icon is delighted to be able to respond to the call from BEFS to inform a response to the Europe and External Relations Committee’s call for evidence on Scotland’s relationship with the EU. We provide information below on the connections, initiatives and relationships that Icon and our profession have with Europe currently.

The Institute of Conservation (Icon) is a registered charity and the professional body for the conservation of cultural heritage. Icon raises awareness of the cultural, social and economic value of caring for heritage and champions high standards of conservation. Icon Scotland Group is one of Icon’s 16 special interest groups.

Heritage Science research funding

The science of heritage conservation is a relatively new field and is a field where the UK has a global standing and reputation. This research is essential to inform the care and preservation of our cultural heritage. Around 50% of funding for heritage science comes from the EU. This compares to about 7% of total public research funding being from the UK. (Source: conference on Science and Engineering in Arts, Heritage and Archaeology (http://www.seaha-cdt.ac.uk/seaha-conference-2016/), Dr Adam Cooper, Lecturer in Social Science and Public Policy at UCL)

Ongoing research is needed to develop improved ways of looking after our historic buildings and museum collections that are continually in need of conservation and maintenance.

If EU funding for this research is removed without replacing it we will lose the ability to care for much that is of value to us as a country and much that is the primary reason for overseas visitors to come to the UK.

Skills Training and Provision across the UK and EU

There are a little over 3000 conservators working in the UK.2 This small field relies on cross-border training and the movement of specialists between nation states. For example, a book conservator may train in Germany and practice in Scotland or a textile conservator may train in Scotland and practice in France.

The sector is too small for the UK to provide education and training in all specialisms at all levels within its borders. We need, for example, the ability to import stone conservators from Germany who get a level of training that is simply not available in the UK.

The profession of Conservator is included in the EU Free Movement of Regulated Professionals legislation which formalises the ability of UK trained conservators to use their qualifications across the EU and vice-versa. This free movement of expertise also gives us the opportunity to take skills acquired in the UK and use them overseas. For example, stained glass conservators could provide expertise to projects in Ireland.

The training of conservators that is available in Scotland (primarily the Textile Conservation Centre at Glasgow University) relies on having non-UK students. This specialist post-graduate training will be less attractive to potential students if these students become unable to use their training in the rest of the EU (if they are UK citizens) or in the UK (if they are EU citizens). It will also be less attractive to EU students if they are required to pay non-EU tuition fees (currently about double EU fees). This would result in less demand for the courses and might risk their viability. This in turn risks further undermining training provision for the UK and the EU.

We hope this is useful to the Forum, and look forward to hearing about progress in due course.

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